Jacques-Yves Cousteau

Jacques-Yves Cousteau

Jacques-Yves Cousteau

Birth : Jacques-Yves Cousteau (1910-06-11)11 June 1910 Saint-André-de-Cubzac, France

Death : 25 June 1997(1997-06-25)(aged 87) Paris, France

Personal Information

Name Jacques-Yves Cousteau
Birth (1910-06-11)11 June 1910 Saint-André-de-Cubzac, France
Birth Place Saint-André-de-Cubzac, France
Death (1997-06-25)(aged 87) Paris, France
Died At Paris, France
Nationality French

Word Cloud

Events Occured in Scienctist Life

1910

Jacques-Yves Cousteau, (, also UK: , French: ; 11 June 1910 – 25 June 1997) was a French naval officer, explorer, conservationist, filmmaker, innovator, scientist, photographer, author and researcher who studied the sea and all forms of life in water.

1956

Cousteau also directed films, most notably the documentary adaptation of the book, The Silent World, which won a Palme d'or at the 1956 Cannes Film Festival.

2004

He remained the only person to win a Palme d'Or for a documentary film, until Michael Moore won the award in 2004 for Fahrenheit 9/11.

1910

Cousteau was born on 11 June 1910, in Saint-André-de-Cubzac, Gironde, France, to Daniel and Élisabeth Cousteau.

1930

In 1930, he entered the École Navale and graduated as a gunnery officer.

1936

In Toulon, where he was serving on the Condorcet, Cousteau carried out his first underwater experiments, thanks to his friend Philippe Tailliez who in 1936 lent him some Fernez underwater goggles, predecessors of modern swimming goggles.

1935

Cousteau also belonged to the information service of the French Navy, and was sent on missions to Shanghai and Japan (1935–1938) and in the USSR (1939).On 12 July 1937 he married Simone Melchior, with whom he had two sons, Jean-Michel (born 1938) and Philippe (1940–1979).

1991

In 1991, one year after his wife Simone's death from cancer, he married Francine Triplet.

1980

They already had a daughter Diane Cousteau (born 1980) and a son, Pierre-Yves Cousteau (born 1982), born during Cousteau's marriage to his first wife.

1940

After the armistice of 1940, the family of Simone and Jacques-Yves Cousteau took refuge in Megève, where he became a friend of the Ichac family who also lived there.

1943

The two neighbors took the first ex-aequo prize of the Congress of Documentary Film in 1943, for the first French underwater film: Par dix-huit mètres de fond (18 meters deep), made without breathing apparatus the previous year in the Embiez islands in Var, with Philippe Tailliez and Frédéric Dumas, using a depth-pressure-proof camera case developed by mechanical engineer Léon Vèche, an engineer of Arts and Measures at the Naval College.

1943

In 1943, they made the film Épaves (Shipwrecks), in which they used two of the very first Aqua-Lung prototypes.

1946

At that time, he kept his distance from his brother Pierre-Antoine Cousteau, a "pen anti-semite" who wrote the collaborationist newspaper Je suis partout (I am everywhere) and who received the death sentence in 1946.

1954

However, this was later commuted to a life sentence, and Pierre-Antoine was released in 1954.

1940

During the 1940s, Cousteau is credited with improving the Aqua-Lung design which gave birth to the open-circuit scuba technology used today.

1953

According to his first book, The Silent World: A Story of Undersea Discovery and Adventure (1953), Cousteau started diving with Fernez goggles in 1936, and in 1939 used the self-contained underwater breathing apparatus invented in 1926 by Commander Yves le Prieur.

1942

Cousteau was not satisfied with the length of time he could spend underwater with the Le Prieur apparatus so he improved it to extend underwater duration by adding a demand regulator, invented in 1942 by Émile Gagnan.

1943

In 1943 Cousteau tried out the first prototype Aqua-Lung which finally made extended underwater exploration possible.

1946

In 1946, Cousteau and Tailliez showed the film Épaves ("Shipwrecks") to Admiral Lemonnier, who gave them the responsibility of setting up the Groupement de Recherches Sous-marines (GRS)

1947

In 1947, Chief Petty Officer Maurice Fargues became the first diver to die using an aqualung, while attempting a new depth record with the GERS near Toulon.

1948

In 1948, between missions of mine clearance, underwater exploration and technological and physiological tests, Cousteau undertook a first campaign in the Mediterranean on board the sloop Élie Monnier, with Philippe Tailliez, Frédéric Dumas, Jean Alinat and the scenario writer Marcel Ichac.

1949

Cousteau and the Élie Monnier then took part in the rescue of Professor Jacques Piccard's bathyscaphe, the FNRS-2, during the 1949 expedition to Dakar.

1949

In 1949, Cousteau left the French Navy.

1950

In 1950, he founded the French Oceanographic Campaigns (FOC), and leased a ship called Calypso from Thomas Loel Guinness for a symbolic one franc a year.

1952

He also carried out underwater archaeological excavations in the Mediterranean, in particular at Grand-Congloué (1952).

1953

With the publication of his first book in 1953, The Silent World, he correctly predicted the existence of the echolocation abilities of porpoises.

1954

In 1954, Cousteau conducted a survey of Abu Dhabi waters on behalf of British Petroleum.

1956

Cousteau won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1956 for The Silent World co-produced with Malle.

1957

In 1957, Cousteau took over as leader of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.

1965

The successful experiment was quickly repeated in 1965 with two vehicles which reached 500 meters.

1957

In 1957, he was elected as director of the Oceanographical Museum of Monaco.

1959

He was involved in the creation of Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques and served as its inaugural president from 1959 to 1973.Cousteau also took part in inventing the "SP-350 Denise Diving Saucer" in 1959 which was an invention best for exploring the ocean floor, as it allowed one to explore on solid ground.

1960

In October 1960, a large amount of radioactive waste was going to be discarded in the Mediterranean Sea by the Commissariat à l'énergie atomique (CEA).

1960

In the 1960s Cousteau was involved with a set of three projects to build underwater "villages"; the projects were named Precontinent I, Precontinent II and Precontinent III.

1962

The projects are best known as Conshelf I (1962), Conshelf II (1963), and Conshelf III (1965).

1966

This documentary television series ran for ten years from 1966 to 1976.

1977

A second documentary series, The Cousteau Odyssey, ran from 1977 to 1982 on public television stations.

1970

In 1970, he wrote the book The Shark:

1972

In December 1972, two years after the volcano's last eruption, The Cousteau Society was filming Voyage au bout du monde on Deception Island, Antarctica, when Michel Laval, Calypso's second in command, was struck and killed by a rotor of the helicopter that was ferrying between Calypso and the island.

1973

In 1973, along with his two sons and Frederick Hyman, he created the Cousteau Society for the Protection of Ocean Life, Frederick Hyman being its first President.

1975

In 1975, John Denver released the tribute song "Calypso" on his album Windsong, and on the B-side of his hit song "I'm Sorry". "

1976

In 1976, Cousteau located the wreck of HMHS Britannic.

1977

In 1977, together with Peter Scott, he received the UN International Environment prize.

1979

On 28 June 1979, while the Calypso was on an expedition to Portugal, his second son Philippe, his preferred and designated successor and with whom he had co-produced all his films since 1969, died in a PBY Catalina flying boat crash in the Tagus river near Lisbon.

1980

From 1980 to 1981, he was a regular on the animal reality show Those Amazing Animals, along with Burgess Meredith, Priscilla Presley, and Jim Stafford.

1980

In 1980, Cousteau traveled to Canada to make two films on the Saint Lawrence River and the Great Lakes, Cries from the Deep and St. Lawrence:

1985

In 1985, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from Ronald Reagan.

1986

From 1986 to 1992, Cousteau released Rediscovery of the World.

1988

On 24 November 1988, he was elected to the Académie française, chair 17, succeeding Jean Delay.

1989

His official reception under the cupola took place on 22 June 1989, the response to his speech of reception being given by Bertrand Poirot-Delpech.

1998

After his death, he was replaced by Érik Orsenna on 28 May 1998.

1990

In June 1990, the composer Jean Michel Jarre paid homage to the commander by entitling his new album Waiting for Cousteau.

1990

On 2 December 1990, his wife Simone Cousteau died of cancer.

1991

In June 1991, in Paris, Jacques-Yves Cousteau remarried, to Francine Triplet, with whom he had (before this marriage)

1991

In November 1991, Cousteau gave an interview to the UNESCO Courier, in which he stated that he was in favour of human population control and population decrease.

1992

In 1992, he was invited to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the United Nations' International Conference on Environment and Development, and then he became a regular consultant for the UN and the World Bank.

1995

In 1995, he sued his son, who was advertising "Cousteau Fiji Islands Resort", to prevent him from using the Cousteau name for business purposes in the United States.

1996

On 11 January 1996, Calypso was accidentally rammed and sunk in the port of Singapore by a barge.

1997

Jacques-Yves Cousteau died of a heart attack on 25 June 1997 in Paris, two weeks after his 87th birthday.

1939

During his lifetime, Jacques-Yves Cousteau received these distinctions: Cross of War 1939–1945 (1945) National Geographic Society's Special Gold Medal in 1961 Commander of the Legion of Honour (1972)

2007

In 2007, the International Watch Company introduced the IWC Aquatimer Chronograph "Cousteau Divers" Special Edition.