Geordie Williamson

Geordie Williamson

Geordie Williamson

Birth : 1981 (age 38–39) Bowral,Australia

Personal Information

Name Geordie Williamson
Birth (age 38–39) Bowral,Australia
Birth Place (age 38–39) Bowral,Australia
Alma Mater University of Sydney(BA) University of Freiburg(PhD)
Institution University of Sydney University of Oxford Max Planck Institute for Mathematics)
Thesis Singular Soergel bimodules(2008)

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Events Occured in Scienctist Life

1981

Geordie Williamson (born 1981 in Bowral, Australia) is an Australian mathematician at the University of Sydney.

2018

He became the youngest living Fellow of the Royal Society when he was elected in 2018 at the age of 36.

1999

Educated at Chevalier College, Williamson studied from 1999 at the University of Sydney and graduated with a Bachelor's degree in 2003 and then at the Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg, where he received his doctorate in 2008 under the supervision of Wolfgang Soergel.

2011

After his PhD, Williamson was a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, based at St. Peter's College, Oxford and from 2011 until 2016 he was at the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics.

1981

With Ben Elias, he gave a new proof and a simplification of the theory of the Kazhdan–Lusztig conjectures (previously proved in 1981 by both Beilinson–Bernstein and Brylinski–Kashiwara).

1994

The conjecture was proved in 1994 by Henning Haahr Andersen, Jens Carsten Jantzen and Wolfgang Soergel for sufficiently large group-specific characteristics (without explicit bound) and later by Peter Fiebig for a very high explicitly stated bound.

1990

He also found counterexamples to a 1990 conjecture of Gordon James on symmetric groups.

2016

In 2016, he received the Chevalley Prize of the American Mathematical Society and the Clay Research Award.

2016

In 2016 he was awarded the EMS Prize, for 2017 he was awarded the New Horizons in Mathematics Prize.

2018

In 2018, he was plenary speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Rio de Janeiro and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) and the Australian Academy of Science.

2018

Williamson was awarded the 2018 Australian Mathematical Society Medal.