Anita Hill

Anita Hill

Anita Hill

Birth : Anita Faye Hill (1956-07-30)July 30, 1956(age 64) Lone Tree, Oklahoma, U.S.

Personal Information

Name Anita Hill
Birth (1956-07-30)July 30, 1956(age 64) Lone Tree, Oklahoma, U.S.
Birth Place (age 64) Lone Tree, Oklahoma, U.S.

Word Cloud

Events Occured in Scienctist Life

1956

Anita Faye Hill (born July 30, 1956) is an American lawyer and academic.

1991

She became a national figure in 1991 when she accused U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, her supervisor at the United States Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, of sexual harassment.

1977

After graduating from Morris High School, Oklahoma, she enrolled at Oklahoma State University and received a bachelor's degree in psychology with honors in 1977.

1980

She went on to Yale Law School, obtaining her Juris Doctor degree with honors in 1980.She was admitted to the District of Columbia Bar in 1980 and began her law career as an associate with the Washington, D.C. firm of Wald, Harkrader & Ross.

1981

In 1981, she became an attorney-adviser to Clarence Thomas, who was then the Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights.

1982

When Thomas became chairman of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in 1982, Hill went along to serve as his assistant, leaving the job in 1983.Hill then became an assistant professor at the Evangelical Christian O. W. Coburn School of Law at Oral Roberts University where she taught from 1983 to 1986.

1986

In 1986, she joined the faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Law where she taught commercial law and contracts.

1991

In 1991, President George H. W. Bush nominated Clarence Thomas, a federal Circuit Judge, to succeed retiring Associate Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.

1991

Hill said on October 11, 1991 in televised hearings that Thomas had sexually harassed her while he was her supervisor at the Department of Education and the EEOC.

1991

Doubts about the veracity of Hill's 1991 testimony persisted long after Thomas took his seat on the Court.

1993

They were furthered by American Spectator writer David Brock in his 1993 book The Real Anita Hill, though he later recanted the claims he had made, described in his book as "character assassination," and apologized to Hill.

1994

Richard Lacayo in his 1994 review of the book for Time magazine remarked, however, that "Their book doesn't quite nail that conclusion."

2007

In 2007, Kevin Merida, a coauthor of another book on Thomas, remarked that what happened between Thomas and Hill was "ultimately unknowable" by others, but that it was clear that "one of them lied, period.

2007

Writing in 2007, Neil Lewis of The New York Times remarked that, "To this day, each side in the epic he-said, she-said dispute has its unmovable believers.

2010

October 2010, Thomas's wife Virginia, a conservative activist, left a voicemail at Hill's office asking that Hill apologize for her 1991 testimony.

1991

When journalist Cinny Kennard asked Hill in 1991 if she would testify against Thomas all over again, Hill answered, "I'm not sure if I could have lived with myself if I had answered those questions any differently.

1992

According to D.C. Congressional Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, Hill's treatment by the panel was a contributing factor to the large number of women elected to Congress in 1992.

1992

In 1992, a feminist group began a nationwide fundraising campaign and then obtained matching state funds to endow a professorship at the University of Oklahoma College of Law in honor of Hill.

1999

The University of Oklahoma Law School defunded the Anita F. Hill professorship in May 1999, without the position having ever been filled.

2019

On April 25, 2019, the presidential campaign team for Joe Biden for the 2020 United States presidential election disclosed that he had called Hill to express "his regret for what she endured" in his role as the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, presiding over the Thomas confirmation hearings.

2019

On June 13, 2019, Hill clarified that she did not consider Biden's actions disqualifying, and would be open to voting for him.

2020

In May 2020, Hill argued that sexual misconduct allegations made against Donald Trump as well as the sexual assault allegation against Biden should be investigated and their results "made available to the public.

2020

September 5, 2020, it was reported that Hill had vowed to vote for Biden and to work with him on gender issues.

1996

She resigned her post in October 1996 and finished her final semester of teaching there.

1997

Hill accepted a position as a visiting scholar at the Institute for the Study of Social Change at University of California, Berkeley in January 1997, but soon joined the faculty of Brandeis University—first at the Women's Studies Program, later moving to the Heller School for Social Policy and Management.

2011

In 2011, she also took a counsel position with the Civil Rights & Employment Practice group of the plaintiffs' law firm Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll.

1995

In 1995, Hill co-edited Race, Gender and Power in America: The Legacy of the Hill-Thomas Hearings with Emma Coleman Jordan.

1997

In 1997 Hill published her autobiography, Speaking Truth to Power, in which she chronicled her role in the Clarence Thomas confirmation controversy and wrote that creating a better society had been a motivating force in her life.

2011

In 2011, Hill published her second book, Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race, and Finding Home, which focuses on the sub-prime lending crisis that resulted in the foreclosure of many homes owned by African-Americans.

2015

On March 26, 2015, the Brandeis Board of Trustees unanimously voted to recognize Hill with a promotion to Private University Professor of Social Policy, Law, and Women's Studies.

2017

On December 16, 2017, the Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace was formed, selecting Hill to lead its charge against sexual harassment in the entertainment industry.

2018

In September 2018, Hill wrote an op-ed in The New York Times regarding sexual assault allegations made by Christine Blasey Ford during the Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination.

2018

On November 8, 2018, Anita Hill spoke at the USC Dornsife's event, "From Social Movement to Social Impact: Putting an End to Sexual Harassment in the Workplace".

1991

In 1991, the television sitcom Designing Women built its episode "The Strange Case of Clarence and Anita" around the hearings on the Clarence Thomas nomination.

1992

Hill is mentioned in the 1992 Sonic Youth song "Youth Against Fascism."

1994

Her case also inspired the 1994 Law & Order episode "Virtue", about a young lawyer who feels pressured to sleep with her supervisor at her law firm.

1996

Anita Hill is mentioned in The X-Files episode "Musings of a Cigarette Smoking Man", which aired November 17, 1996.

1999

In 1999, Ernest Dickerson directed Strange Justice, a film based on the Anita Hill–Clarence Thomas controversy.

2004

Anita Hill is interviewed – unrelated to the Clarence Thomas case – about the film The Tin Drum in the documentary Banned in Oklahoma (2004), included in The Criterion Collection DVD of the film (2004).

2013

Hill was the subject of the 2013 documentary film Anita by director Freida Lee Mock, which chronicles her experience during the Clarence Thomas scandal.

2016

Hill was portrayed by actress Kerry Washington in the 2016 HBO film Confirmation.

2018

In 2018 Hill was interviewed by entertainer, John Oliver on Last Week Tonight answering various questions and concerns about workplace sexual harassment in today's age.

1998

On October 20, 1998, Anita Hill published the book Speaking Truth to Power.

2011

In 2011, Hill's second book, Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race, and Finding Home was published.

1994

In 1994, she wrote a tribute to Thurgood Marshall, the first African American Supreme Court Justice who preceded Clarence Thomas, titled A Tribute to Thurgood Marshall: A Man Who Broke with Tradition on Issues of Race and Gender.

1992

Hill received the American Bar Association's Commission on Women in the Profession's "Women of Achievement" award in 1992.

2005

In 2005, Hill was selected as a Fletcher Foundation Fellow.

2008

In 2008 she was awarded the Louis P. and Evelyn Smith First Amendment Award by the Ford Hall Forum.

1991

Her opening statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1991 is listed as No. 69 in American Rhetoric's Top 100 Speeches of the 20th Century (listed by rank).

1993

She was inducted into the Oklahoma Women's Hall of Fame in 1993.

2017

On January 7, 2017, Hill was inducted as an honorary member of Zeta Phi Beta sorority at their National Executive Board Meeting in Dallas, Texas.

2019

The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on November 8, 2019 (M.P.C. 117229).

2011

Stories of Gender, Race, and Finding Home on October 4, 2011, on Forum Network.