Alexander Dounce

Alexander Dounce

Alexander Dounce

Birth : (1909-12-07)December 7, 1909 New York, United States

Death : April 24, 1997(1997-04-24)(aged 87) Rochester, New York, United States

Personal Information

Name Alexander Dounce
Birth (1909-12-07)December 7, 1909 New York, United States
Birth Place New York, United States
Death (1997-04-24)(aged 87) Rochester, New York, United States
Died At Rochester, New York, United States
Nationality United States
Alma Mater Hamilton College, Cornell University
Fields Organic chemistry, biochemistry
Institution Cornell University(1936–1941)
,University of Rochester(1941–retirement)
Thesis Study of dihydrofurans and the dehydration rearrangement of 2,3-ethylenic 1,4-diols.(1935)
Famous Research Dounce homogenizer; co-discovery ofcatalasecrystallization
Doctoral Advisor James B. Sumner

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Events Occured in Scienctist Life

1909

Alexander Dounce was born on December 7, 1909, in New York.

1935

Dounce received his PhD in organic chemistry in 1935, the title of his thesis being "Study of dihydrofurans and the dehydration rearrangement of 2,3-ethylenic 1,4-diols".

1937

Together with Sumner, he achieved the first crystallization of the enzyme catalase in 1937.

1941

In 1941, Dounce moved to the Department of Biochemistry at University of Rochester Medical School, where he worked on the mechanism of uranium poisoning for the Manhattan Project.

1952

In 1952, Alexander Dounce and Ernest Kay, who was Dounce's first PhD student, published a new method for DNA isolation and purification from nuclei employing sodium dodecyl sulfate that became widely used.

1952

Also in 1952, Dounce wrote a review article in which he, as one of the first scientists to do so, proposed that DNA might serve as a template for the synthesis of RNA, which in turn serves as a template for the synthesis of proteins.

1958

However, it was not until 1958, when Crick coined the term central dogma and described the concept in more detail, that it gained widespread acceptance.

1954

When James D. Watson and George Gamow founded the RNA Tie Club in 1954, Dounce became one of its members; his designation was GLN (glutamine).

1954

Dounce's work on the isolation of cellular organelles, particularly nuclei and mitochondria, led to the development of the Dounce homogenizers in 1954.

1955

When Dounce's former mentor, James B. Sumner, died in 1955, Dounce wrote Sumner's obituary in Nature.

1997

Dounce died on April 24, 1997, in Rochester, New York.